Monthly Archives: August 2007

A toddler’s view of language

The 4-year-old showed a keen grasp of linguistics / poetic language this weekend: The Little Man has been out of his mind with anticipation this weekend, and also from the heat.  As a result, he’s been spending some time in … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | 3 Comments

Vitalchek is terrible

We don’t have a birth certificate for the Little Man. Obviously we are terrible parents, but the fact of the matter is, in Georgia you have to wait X number of weeks after the birth of your child to send … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | 16 Comments

Inbox sickness

It can’t possibly be good that, while listening to Merlin Mann’s “Inbox Zero” talk, I responded to a blog comment w/in about a minute, caught up on some blog feeds, and since both my e-mail accounts are up and set … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | 1 Comment

Texas: Finally solving *real* problems in education

From this morning’s Inside Higher Ed: Policies that allow students to try out courses and drop them by a certain deadline are a time-honored way for colleges to encourage students to sign up for classes they’re not sure about or … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | 4 Comments

Interview with Jean-Paul Pecqueur

This week’s post at Bookslut is a treat: An interview with Jean-Paul Pecqueur, whose book of poems, The Case Against Happiness, came out in November. What did happiness ever do to you? Why prosecute a case against it? It eluded … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Review: Glean, by Joshua Kryah

My review of Glean is in this month’s Bookslut: Prior to Joshua Kryah’s first book of poems, Glean, only one poet in the language had thought to include both “purblind” and “unbloom” in a single work. But Kryah’s opening poem, … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Review: Theory of Orange, by Rachel M. Simon

My review of Theory of Orange is in this month’s Bookslut: In characterizing Theory of Orange as comfort food, I’m not trying to be patronizing — rather, it strikes me that her basic method is to take a familiar conceit … Continue reading

Posted in books | Leave a comment